Stevio...LA LA Lovin' It?

I'm British-born Chinese from Bristol, UK. I’m LA-based. I’m a hip hop aficionado. Back in the 80s I was a DJ. In the 90s I contributed to the world's first street style exhibition at London's Victoria & Albert Museum.

After 15 years in London I moved to LA to pursue a new career and outlook on life. Today, I’m keeping busy with music, art, photos and writing. LA lets me wear flip-flops year round and has given me an appreciation of Mexican food! Check my Hall/Fame.

Sunday, March 16, 2014

Gajin Fujita...LA's "finest" graffiti artist


Gajin Fujita's work has strong influences from his graffiti past - Olde English lettering, East Los Angeles tags and stencils. He still uses aerosol, but he has gained a higher level of aesthetic by incorporating his Japanese hertitage and artistic traditions, like gold leaf and Ukiyo-e woodblock designs. He has also gained the establishment's respect through these initials, BFA and MFA.

These are not gang affiliations or graffiti crews Fujita is down with. These credentials are his fine arts education gained from Otis and University of Nevada. With these, Gaijin Fujita has gained entry into exhibtions at Los Angeles Contemporary Museum of Art and Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art in Missouri. He is also represented by LA Louver gallery in Venice, California.



"Made in L.A.," Gajin Fujita (2011)

High Voltage II, Gajin Fujita (2011)

Opposites Attract  What attracted me Fujita's work was his bold graffiti imagery, his strong connection to Los Angeles and the Asian influences. Samuri warriors, geishas, dragons, gold leaf. The juxtaposition of 17th Century Japanese artcraft with 20th Century "K2S" (Kill to Succeed) graffiti tags and letter styles.

Kill 2 Succeed reference book of styles, Big Sleeps and Defer

Take Two  This week, Gajin Fujita was featured in two art shows in Los Angeles. Both shows opened on the same night and I still didn't get to meet the artist. Right place, wrong time?

I got to see his work at the "LA Heat" exhibition, which runs until July 12th at the Chinese American Museum, details below.

LA Heat, Gajin Fujita (2014)

I still need to go see his drawings being exhibited at LA Louver gallery in Venice, CA.

Study for Bewitched, Gajin Fujita

"L.A. Heat" will run through July 12, 2014.
Chinese American Museum, 425 North Los Angeles St., Los Angeles.
www.camla.org.
(Suggested admission is $3 for adults, $2 for seniors 60 and over, and students with ID.)

"Gajin Fujita: Drawings" will run April 26th, 2014
L.A. Louver
45 North Venice Boulevard, Venice, California 90291
Tel: 310.822.4955
www.lalouver.com

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Sunday, March 02, 2014

How London rules street fashion....

A year ago Frank 151, New York's urban marketing powerhouse, published an interesting article about London's Foot Patrol (or is it Footpatrol), a sneaker store founded by Fraser Cooke (Nike,) Michael Kopelman (Stussy, Hideout/Hit & Run) and Simon Porter in 2002.

I visited a couple of times before I left London and had no idea until reading the article that retail megachain, JD Sports, acquired Foot Patrol. That could've been a horrible death of an innovative store. But, it seems that the store has continued to tread the sneaker leadership path under the new management. Read more about how Foot Patrol has fueled British youth's street style addiction here.

Three degrees of separation  I remember Fraser Cooke as "a friend of a friend" (Dexter Norris/The Brotherhood > Trevor Jackson/Underdog > ) who was wholesaling cool American street clothing and, through that, he was connected to the London hip hop scene. Or was it vice versa? Anyway, I heard he joined Nike as their man with "finger on street style's pulse." The actual truth can be read in this KTC  article that was picked up by Hypebeast last summer. There's so much history about the London scene in this interview and now Fraser lives in Los Angeles, after moving back to the U.S. from Tokyo. May be our paths will cross!?


Fraser Cooke, Nike Energy Marketing



"From London to Tokyo, Mo’ Wax to Nike, hairdresser to brand heavyweight – Fraser Cooke talks about the inspired and fluid journey that has taken him to where he is now. The Nike Global Energy Marketing Director exerts huge influence on the realms of streetwear, brand innovation, marketing and inevitably design. 
So you’re from London? Yes, I was born in Whitechapel, East London but I grew up on the end of the Central line (east) in the suburbs, but I lived all over London. The final place I had before moving abroad was in Islington close to Highbury Stadium. 
I used to live in Shoreditch around 1995 and it was dead around there, it was so cheap to live in a loft. There were no shops open at night, if you needed a pint of milk you had to go to the petrol station. In contrast to how it is now, back then it was like a ghost town at the weekend. 
When I visit London now, I stay in Kensington. I prefer that these days. I like the slickness a bit more. I can see if you are young that it must be quite exciting to live in East London but, personally it’s not what I am looking for these days. 
So how did you get into the industry? What is your background? When I was growing up I was always into skateboarding, Hip Hop music and stuff like that and it was always in the background. Originally, I trained as a hairdresser and worked for Vidal Sassoon. I did a three-year apprenticeship and moved on from there to a salon in Soho called D-Mob, which was a bit of a scene. They had their own clothes store and also a salon. Nearby was another clothes store called Passenger and I used to cut the guy’s hair that worked in there. 
Around this time I was quite friendly with Karl Templar who was at the time working at the Face. They were doing this thing called Fashion Hype at the time, which looked at new cool stuff in the front section of the magazine. There was a large American influence; Public Enemy was very big so they may have styled someone in a Raiders Starter jacket or something like that. I was into that sort of stuff and into sneakers and the guy who worked at the store (Passenger) asked me if I wanted to come and work as a buyer. I was a little tired of cutting hair at that point and felt this job was a kind of calling, which I think it has to be if you’re going to do anything for a long time. 
Can you talk us through your early years in that role? So it was around 1989 and I went and started working for this guy. Almost immediately I had to go to New York. We would go about once a month and see companies like New Era. They’re quite big now but back then they weren’t so much. We started buying up baseball caps and varsity jackets. We would go over to Brooklyn to Dr Jay’s and buy up all their adidas Superstars, which must have been $19, a pair – deadstock. Made In France. Nobody cared about it then, they were like ‘OK, so you want to buy ALL of them?’ 
This was before any reissuing or anything. We used to work with some other stores with a lot of deadstock inventory, old Nike’s, old suede Fila’s, which were very popular, back then. I only worked there for less than a year till we parted ways but I made a lot of good contacts in New York and some good friends. 
You went back to cutting hair? Yes, after that, I went back to cutting hair temporarily but while I had been in New York I met a guy called Don who had a label called Pervert and he kept sending me stuff. I would give it to Karl (Templar) who was still at the Face and he would feature it in the magazine. He would put my number in there as a contact and suddenly I became a distributor by default. Stores would call me asking where they could get stock.
So as a result, I learned that I could make some money out of this and earn a living. Back then I really wanted to live in the US as I was excited about the things that were coming out of there – musically and stylistically. So I set up my own distribution company and would go back and forth to New York and it funded itself as a business.
 
As well as this, I was also doing other projects such as working with Blackmarket Records in London. The Rave scene was very big and we would sell tickets out of the store. As a result I ended up meeting James Lavelle who had just started Mo’ Wax. He was working at Honest John’s record store and I was living off Portobello Road. He was a young kid from Oxford and he said he needed somewhere to stay, so suddenly I had a flat mate and by default Tim Goldsworthy (producer an Mo’ Wax co-founder) would stay as well. 
You ended up working together? Well James was into the Hip Hop stuff that was I playing so I guess we inspired each other and I became an early employee of Mo’ Wax. On the very first few releases you can see it’s only the three of us credited. 
I began doing some deals with companies to license tracks and also James needed some merchandise. So I started making T-shirts and bags for the label with people that I knew along with doing my own distribution for my own company. We all moved into an office together and this went on for a few years. 
It sounds like quite a fluid and flexible way to work. You diversified into doing other things too didn’t you? I was doing this and that, DJing, a lot of writing, I used to write for the Face and i-D, Arena Homme+. 
I was always quite friendly with Michael Kopelman (from Gimme5); he was someone I would run into. We would come out to the States twice a year to the action sports retailer tradeshows. Michael was always big into the Japanese side of street wear and one day explained to me that he really wanted to do the Japanese market and American market properly and not just as a wholesaler. He didn’t think that any of the stores were representing it very well and asked how I felt about ‘teaming up and opening a shop?’ And at that time I was ready for moving on to the next thing so it seemed right. 
This was when The Hideout first opened then? Yes, we opened up under the name Hit and Run but we had to change it because the name was registered elsewhere. It then became The Hideout. This was 1997 and I would say it was perhaps the first genuine Street wear store outside of Japan. It was a great time, it was a good scene, the Mo’ Wax thing was still happening, the Bathing Ape thing was kicking in early and I was still DJing. (London nightclub) Fabric had just opened and we started doing stuff with them. It was good. 
How did the hook up between yourselves and Nike get going?
After a couple of years we got approached by some guys from Nike who was doing a form of what we would term now as Energy Marketing, this was done via placement and trying to push product that other stores wouldn’t take as it was too risky. The first thing he brought to us was the Air Woven, so we turned the store into a pop up Nike store for a few weeks and it just blew out – people went crazy for them.
 
We were also quite close with Hiroshi Fujiwara who I had met a few years back through Mo’ Wax. Hiroshi was already getting involved with Nike in Japan but saw the collaborations we had been doing which influenced him greatly, things like the Wovens and subsequently the HTM shoes. 
What we found was that the customer who would buy sneakers from us wasn’t necessarily the same one that would buy the apparel lines we were doing. We felt there was a lack of good focused boutique sneaker related stores, so Michael and I opened Foot Patrol. Around the world other boutiques began to open such as Undefeated and Alife Rivington Club, which became the core sneaker destinations. It was exciting and new yet it seemed quite tough to get the right product. I think it was hard for the brands to justify why they would give this little store that doesn’t buy much this exclusive product. But all of us were at the scene and hooked up with the media so we made it work and showed our influence in other ways. But we learned over a few years that the business model was very difficult, and I would say it still is now. 
So despite having to play the game of retail, you’d sown the seeds with Nike. How did your relationship continue to build from that point?
During that period a group of very senior people at NIKE did a European tour and went to Milan, Paris and then finally London. In each city someone outside the company was invited in to show them around. In London, I was that guy. We spent three days together and I took them to different places, I took them to the store. We already had a good relationship with Nike as we had been working these projects together and at the end of this trip they approached me and asked if I would consider working for them.
 
What does your role entail? I work in a part of the company called Energy Marketing which is where we look at the evolution of culture, where it’s heading, how sport is evolving culturally and informing or being informed by art, music etc. We have people in a number of cities and they open up conversations. The idea is that they put Nike’s work in front of people that are a little more forward thinking with their ideas. It’s about finding those people who appreciate when things are different, who aren’t followers and can see when something is interesting.
Initially, I moved to Portland to work on the marketing side but my thing was that I was always into product – I was a buyer and a distributor and had been working in retail so I came from the unique position of also having this insight. Now, it’s my job to help consult on each part of the process. From product inception to design, to sales, marketing etc.
 
What was the thinking behind the move to Japan? I went from Portland to Tokyo as I felt I was losing touch with the things that were inmportant to me and the job I was trying to do. Tokyo was doing very much as it does now in influencing Europe and Asia. They were the pioneers. To me, streetwear as we know it now is not an American thing. It was instigated in America but what it is today is because of the Japanese. 
So can you tell us about how you met Jun Takahashi? I’ve known Jun Takahashi since 1997 when I first visited Japan. He was a friend of a friend who used to work at Gimme 5. Subsequently, when I would visit Japan I would sometimes stay at his house so we’ve had quite a long term friendship. 
How did the relationship between Jun and Nike come about?
Jun is a great designer and is also one of the most creative people I know. His work lives in the fashion world but he also has a street edge. I was looking for a way to bring him into working with Nike but it wasn’t always the right time. And then, a few years ago, Jun got heavily into running. Obviously running is the roots of Nike so this seemed like something we could look at. So, I called Jun up and suggested he may want to do a project with us that focused on running. Jun was interested, I think for him it was a case of “I’m in as long as it’s not a fashion project because that’s what I do anyway”.
 
How did it progress from there? We began this project with a fairly small capsule collection and I worked on the marketing helping to facilitate the process by making sure it got in front of the right people and in the right stores. Jun has a lot of ideas so there’s always a lot of input back and forth, and I am the main liaison between the two sides. Since the first drop we’ve done several collections and are widely regarded as some of the strongest product Nike has to offer. 
Can you tell us a little bit about the Gyakusou project? A lot of people mention that the Gyakusou project is so forward thinking but quite honestly, it’s something that really comes from the top of the company. Our CEO is a designer and he likes to push the edges. A lot of the classic Nike’s came from his hand and mind. He was a big supporter of this project. When you bring in someone from another industry who understands sport you learn new things about the way things can be made or the way problems can be approached. And they learn from us too. We work with some of the most demanding and driven human beings on the planet, so the skill set and abilities within the company are strong and very broad. But going back to the influence of our CEO and his desire to push the boundaries of design…We are involved with a project with the artist Tom Sachs that came out weeks ago and when I first started with Nike we did a project with Marc Newsom (industrial designer). Nike is definitely the leader in terms of sports performance innovation but we also like to get involved in these projects. I don’t think they’re termed as fashion, probably closer to art, craft and the way designers approach a problem. Someone like Jun for instance is an artist in his own way as well as being a genuine runner. He is always training and trying to improve as a runner. So with this collaboration, he approaches it is an athlete who has a unique understanding of design." Glenn Kitson for KTC.

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Monday, February 24, 2014

adidas Top Ten...re-issue of a classic!

Where you you in 1979? I was in Bristol, England playing Top Trump Horror Cards in the school yard. I should've been noticing that adidas released its Top Ten basketball sneaker! :)

Now, in 1979 I was 'yeh-high' and wasn't playing basketball of any sort. But, today, I recognize the dope, old skool design. (Actually, adidas' website pointed out the finer details of the shoe!) The pivot point might look like a circle on the rubber sole, but it was a big deal on the ball courts in the '70s!



I got my "lifestyle" snakeskin Top Tens about a decade ago. I still haven't worn them. Now adidas has released a whole Top Ten collection with a vintage feel and a contemporary twist. Check out the Top Ten sweatshirt. Nice, but not as cool as my retro '80s My Adidas Run DMC sweat!



Strike a pose  Along with this Top Ten re-release adidas has a competition tied into a cool mobile photo app. You can win the chance to shoot the next catalog. The app runs in your phone's web browser and lets you take a pic and then add a custom filter. Check out my effort below!




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Saturday, February 22, 2014

Crazy edits! Brian Williams raps "Rapper's Delight!"



You have to love Jimmy Fallon for bringing the old skool hip hop flavors to mainstream!

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Saturday, February 08, 2014

Jamel Shabazz: Street Photographer documentary presented by Charlie Ahearn

If you're in New York this Monday 10th, February, then head on down to The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem. Charlie Ahearn is presenting his film, "Jamel Shabazz Street Photographer" and doing a talkback session. See below for the screening details.

The first time I saw Jamel Shabazz's book, "Back In The Days," was in a store called Apartment on Crosby St. in New York set up by Design Group. The concept was everything on display was for sale. And everything on sale was set-up in someone's (stylized) apartment. In the 'living room' was a coffee table with Jamel's book, alongside a classic boombox. This was retail staging at its extreme!

Since then, I've met Jamel a couple of times, both in galleries. Once at Dazed and Confused in London and again many years later at the Scion Gallery in Culver City. (R.I.P.) So, I guess I was sleeping when I missed writing about Charlie Ahearn's documentary about Jamel back in 2011 when the project was completed. You can never tire of hearing Jamel's story about why and how he captured these street portraits. His photos document urban life, hip hop fashion trends that is so real you feel like a voyeur transported back in time...Back in the days!



Check out Jamel's work at his website and buy his books on Amazon - he even has his own page.

Join director Charlie Ahearn (Wild Style) for a talkback with Jamel Shabazz
Monday, February 10, 2014, 6:30-8.00p.m. EST
FREE - Register here.

Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Langston Hughes Auditorium (partially accessible to wheelchairs)
515 Malcolm X Blvd, New York, NY 10037
+1 212 491-2200

Subway
2, 3 to 135th Street

MTA Bus
M7 M102
to 135th Street

Driving
FDR Drive to Harlem River Drive; Harlem River Drive to 135th St.; two blocks west; Interstate 87 (Major Deegan Expressway.

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Tuesday, February 04, 2014

Tats Cru's BG183 solo show opens tomorrow...LES

My hip hop journey has led me to seek out the original influences of the culture...breaks, radio mixes, graffiti...One fascination for me has been classic 80's hip hop fashion. This the subject of BG183's solo show aptly named, "Fashion," opening in New York's bOb Gallery Wednesday evening.

Fat gold chains, Puma Suedes, Cazals...all that good stuff. For more on BG183 and Tats Cru check out my interview for the "Art in the Streets" edition of Unleashed Magazine in 2011 for my article entitled, "Branded Street Art."

bOb is a bar/artspace that has invited curators to present some interesting graffiti-related shows in the past. In recent years it has exhibited Claw Money (NYC,) Shiro (Japan,) Girls on Top (UK,) Abby, (NYC,) Andrea von Bujdoss (NYC,) and Erotica67 (NYC.) Check out the website for more info.

(A bit of trivia: in the past, another Tats Cru member, Bio, has also shown at this space.)

"bOb Bar NYC is a hip-hop oriented lounge, bar, and gallery located New York City’s Lower East Side, which showcases the work of both local and international artists. Over the past twenty years, bOb has featured exhibitions by a wide array of artists from around the globe, including Futura 2000, Seen, Lee Quinones, Jose Parla, Rey Parla, Rostarr, Che Jen, Kostas, David Ellis, Bäst,  Bio, Ewok, Shepard Fairey, Anarkia Boladona, Shiro, Pesu, Clawmoney, Abby Tc5, Girls on Top, and Queen Andrea." bOb website.

bOb Gallery
235 Eldridge Street (between Stanton and Houston)
New York, New York

Wednesday 5th February, 7-10pm

Directions: F train to Second Avenue.


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Monday, October 21, 2013

adidas Originals Collectors Project #adidasoriginals


adidas has developed so many sub-brands: NEO, Y-3, SLVR, Stella McCartney, Porsche Design, etc., it's hard to remember what adidas means to me?! But, the one adidas brand that keeps me engaged is its adidas Originals collections.

You have to get past the adidas Originals' stale, 2-D, flat website and its uninspiring online apparel catalog (thumbnail pictures with no flavor!) Because, once you do you cannot ignore some of the hotness that adidas has produced in the name of Originals!

On the huuuge scale, the Superstar 35th anniversary with its 35 pairs of collaboration Superstars was a major attention grabber! Big up adidas! On the smaller scale, the Bedroom Rockers book in collaboration with XLR8R Magazine made an impression on me.

adidas Superstar 35th Anniversary Series

adidas x XLR8R Magazine photograph 97 DJs' studios 

The latest creative endeavors is the "Originals Collectors Project." This time, adidas has gone international again and chosen five adidas sneaker collectors and given them access to the adidas HQ in Herzogenaurach, Germany. The task? To design their signature version of their favorite sneaker. WOW!

"adidas Collectors Project brought five of the world's most dedicated and knowledgeable three stripe collectors together at adidas global HQ . 
They were also each given the opportunity to rework their favourite archive model for an extremely limited release." adidas Originals' website

The Chosen Few  The collectors came from the UK (Robert Brooks,) Germany (Julia Schoierer, aka Sneakerqueen,) Finland (Ralk Tittaannen,) and Japan (Mr. Magara.) Out of the five, Operator Emz from New York, gets my vote. His Superstar obsession narrowly beat out Sneakerqueen's Rivalry festish. Both these shoes are my favorite adidas sneakers...black with white stripes, white with black stripes...hi-top, low-top, the list goes on!




Check it, check it out!   Do peep another adidas Originals collaboration. The interactive video concept is kinda unique. The "Unite All Originals" campaign has taken longtime adidas brand ambassadors and rap legends, RUN DMC, and combined them with a contemporary DJ hero, A-Trak. That's kinda interesting. The output is a music recording, some interview footage and a really smart advert video. You type in words to trigger actions in the video! Play with it hereIs it a game? Is it a film? You decide! (If you're lazy, just watch the video below.)


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